CFP: All About Bette: The Cultural Legacies of Bette Davis: Northwestern University, October 5-6, 2018 

This is a notification of a call for papers regarding a two-day conference at Northwestern University about all things Bette Davis, from the industries that created her to the actress herself as an industry. Davis remains emblematic of the historical era of Classical Hollywood Cinema (1929-1960), the aesthetic practices we describe as modernist, and the political practices we describe as feminist. What would it mean to read Bette Davis as modernist? How does Davis operate as a node that allows us to think about the reach of mass culture in shaping (and historicizing) early twentieth century conceptions of femininity, sexuality, embodiment, and agency?

An actress unafraid to play unlikeable women, Davis regularly wrested directorial and production power away from men, earning her the title of “the Fourth Warner Brother” and transforming her from star to auteur. While there is a significant body of work on Davis in film and media scholarship, she has only made a few appearances in literary and cultural studies, primarily in feminist and queer discussions of this period, as in Lauren Berlant and Theresa de Lauretis’s readings of Now, Voyager. This conference seeks to build on that work, exploring the many ways in which Davis was central to mass and popular culture during Hollywood’s Golden Age.

Send proposals of approximately 150 words to Julia Stern: e-mail: j-stern3@northwestern.edu.

Possible topics include 

  • Smoking (as an industry/as an aesthetic/as a politic)
  • Melodrama and the woman’s film
  • Psychoanalysis
  • Modern femininity
  • Bitchiness
  • Davis and/as drag
  • Davis and literary adaptations (Maugham, Hellman, Strachey, Prouty)
  • Davis on Broadway (Ibsen, Williams, Sandburg)
  • The artist vs. the contract system
  • Gay iconicity
  • Material artifacts—publicity materials, costumes
  • Immaterial artifacts: the persistence of Davis in the internet age
  • Davis’s make-up artists/costume designers (Perc Westmore, Orry-Kelly, Edith Head etc.)
  • Davis’s directors (William Wyler, King Vidor, Irving Rapper, Edmund Goulding, Joseph Mankiewicz, Robert Aldrich, etc.)
  • Davis and racial representation
  • Davis and whiteness
  • Davis and the historical imagination
  • Davis and WWII

 

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CfP: Mothers of Invention: Parenting and/as Filmmaking Practice

MOTHERS OF INVENTION: PARENTING AND/AS FILMMAKING PRACTICE, co-edited by Corinn Columpar and Sophie Mayer.

In 1983, E. Ann Kaplan famously called second-wave feminist film culture a movement created by daughters “unwittingly…repeat[ing] the patriarchal omission of the Mother.” By way of what Charlotte Brunsdon has called disidentification, several scholars and practitioners associated with more recent varieties of film feminism, from its third wave to its “post” incarnation, have, unwittingly or not, followed suit. Swimming against this tide, Mothers of Invention invites contributors to help construct a feminist genealogy of a different sort, one that foregrounds the relationship between acts of production on the one hand and those associated with reproductive and caring labour on the other. More specifically, it seeks to build on the ground-breaking industry research already underway at the Raising Films campaign in the UK and Moms in Film in the US in order to create an interdisciplinary edited collection that considers the role that parenting, as both a theme and a diversified practice, plays in film and media cultures.

Mothers of Invention welcomes essays about fatherhood and film and media, but the balance of the volume will be weighted toward mothers and female carers, particularly those from communities that have been historically under-represented, marginalised, and/or excluded from film and moving image practice. As much as the film and media industries, especially at the commercial end, present a challenge for all people with caring responsibilities, those who identify as female remain disproportionately responsible for caring and domestic labour. It is precisely the nature of this challenge – as well as the acts of creative invention and innovative resistance it has inspired – that are of interest to this volume. Indeed, works as diverse as Mary Kelly’s Post Partum Document (1973-79), Agnès Varda’s Daguerréotypes (1976), Arnait Video’s Before Tomorrow (2008), and Sophie Hyde’s 52 Tuesdays (2013) incorporate parenting and caring labour into both their narrative content and their artistic practice and thereby contribute to a transnational and transgenerational body of work has yet to be considered through the lens of feminist parenting studies.

We invite contributions on historical and contemporary global moving image practices, across the spectrum from industrial to artisanal and concerning all key production roles. We are open to a wide range of approaches, from close readings of film and media objects to industrial analyses to studies of circulation and spectatorship, and we welcome work from a variety of disciplines, including the following: film, television, and/or media studies; cultural and creative industries; women and gender studies; moving image practice-based research; media anthropology; and cultural studies. Finally, following Lisa Baraitser’s definitional essay ‘Mothers Who Make Things Public’ (2009), we use the term mother to “denote anyone who both identifies as female and performs primary maternal work, with a ‘child’ being understood as the other whom such a ‘mother’ elects, names and claims as her child,” and carer to denote anyone who performs primary physical and emotional work unremunerated for a partner, parent, sibling, other family member, or friend.

Please submit a 500-word proposal and brief biographical note to corinn.columpar@utoronto.ca and sophie@sophiemayer.net by 1 August 2017.

We anticipate that finished essays will be approximately 6000 words in length, including notes, and we plan to send out acceptances of proposals by the end of September 2017.

Feel free to email us prior to the deadline with any questions.

Remembering Annie Hall: A One Day Conference

Remembering Annie Hall: A One Day Conference
University of Sheffield
31st May 2017
 
Confirmed plenary speaker: Professor Annette Kuhn (Queen Mary, University of London)
 
CALL FOR PAPERS
 
Since its release on 27th April 1977, Annie Hall has established itself as a key film for Woody Allen’s career and the history of romantic comedy more generally. At the 1978 Academy Awards, it won Oscars for Best Film, Best Director, Best Screenplay, and Best Actress. In addition to its central place in Allen’s oeuvre (film critic Roger Ebert called it “just about everyone’s favorite Woody Allen movie”), it is regularly cited as one of the greatest film comedies. In 2015 it was voted the funniest screenplay ever by the Writers Guild of America.
 
To mark the fortieth anniversary of the film’s release, the University of Sheffield is hosting a one-day conference to consider the importance of Annie Hall and its cultural influence. We are particularly interested in conversations stimulated by revisiting the film in the current political climate of President Trump’s government. To that end we welcome papers on all aspects of the film, including its reception and reputation. 
Suggested topics may include but are not limited to the following:
 
 Annie Hall and “New Hollywood”
 Annie Hall as an auteur film
 Annie Hall as (auto)biography
 Annie Hall and fashion
 Annie Hall and feminism
 Annie Hall and whiteness
 Annie Hall and film genre
 Annie Hall and film theory
 Annie Hall and psychoanalysis
 The role of art, transformation and performance
 Representations of the city
 Representations of migrant experience
 Representations (or non-representations) of race
 Romance and sex
 Music and voiceover
 The problem of the Hollywood ending
 Thinking about Annie Hall as (or as not) a Woody Allen film
 Thinking about Annie Hall as a Diane Keaton film
 Annie Hall in 1977 versus Annie Hall in 2017
 Allen’s influences in Annie Hall and/or the influence of Annie Hall today
 Thinking about Annie Hall in the age of Trump
 
Proposals for 20-minute papers (maximum 200 word abstracts, plus a short biographical note of no more than 50 words) are due by 31st March 2017, and should be sent to Annie.Hall@sheffield.ac.uk.
 
We encourage proposals from anyone with an interest in Annie Hall, including established academics, graduate students and independent scholars.
 
There is a conference website: anniehallat40.wordpress.com

CfP: Women in Animation

Call for Papers: Women in Animation

Society for Animation Studies Conference

July 3-7 2017 – University of Padova, Italy


20-minute papers are sought for a pre-constituted panel that will be proposed for the 2017 Society for Animation Studies conference. The panel is interested in exploring the research being done on the history of women in animation and the relationship between the historical perspective and the contemporary context. As such, we are open to proposals that fall under any of these broad areas:

  • The history of women in animation (including case studies of specific animators or contexts)
  • Doing historical research into women in animation (e.g. availability of and access to archives; unwritten and hidden histories, etc)
  • Analyses of the extant research, scholarship and material on the history of women in animation and female animators
  • Examinations and critiques of the concept of gendered aesthetics and style
  • The relationship between the history of women in animation and the contemporary context for female animators.
  • Case studies of contemporary female animators
  • Industry studies perspectives on the contemporary film and media industries and female animators
  • The process of doing research into the contemporary industry or contemporary female animators
  • Presentations from current (or past) practitioners who take any of the above analytical perspectives on their own work/ practice.
(Note, that we are open to interpreting the terms ‘animator’ and ‘animation’ broadly to include things such as V/FX, etc)

Please submit a proposal (approx. 350 words) and short bio (approx. 150 words) to Bella Honess Roe (a.honessroe@surrey.ac.uk) by 18th December.

CfP: Screenwriting: Fact and Fiction, Truth and the Real

Screenwriting: Fact and Fiction, Truth and the Real

Call for Papers

The 10th Screenwriting Research Network (SRN) International Conference will be hosted by the University of Otago’s Department of Media, Film and Communication, in partnership with the New Zealand Writers Guild. It will take place in Dunedin, Aotearoa/New Zealand, on Monday 28th through Thursday 31st August 2017.

The conference theme is Screenwriting: Fact and Fiction, Truth and the Real. SRN2017 will examine how we approach/frame our storytelling, in and from different contexts. This then brings in conventions, orthodoxies, claims about the real and the truth (which might be different from the ‘real’), as well as the cultural and industrial contexts of storytelling practice(s). In other words, how we justify telling our stories in a particular way and how these shifts impact our work as practitioners and scholars: for example, in Aotearoa New Zealand, why it is important to understand different cultural perspectives which include the very nature of storytelling, if we are to get (or get to) a particular truth. We want to discuss the role and function of conventions regarding fact and fiction, as well as interrogating the practices of certain genres and media.

We invite discussion about screenwriting as an art located somewhere between fact, fiction, truth, and the real. We are particularly interested in abstracts for presentations on the following topics:

·       In relation to truth claims and narrative, can we separate the teller from the tale? 

·       Writing the Real: adapting events into stories

·       How does collaborative screenwriting negotiate fact, fiction, truth, and the ‘real’?

·       How do we frame the local, the national, and the indigenous? 

·       How can we narrate from a transnational position?

·       How do specific orthodox screenwriting frameworks affect the tales we tell?

·       Teaching fact, fiction, truth, and the ‘real’ in screenwriting

·       Reflections on narrative theory and conventions  

·       Screenwriting and Literature: the adaptation of source narratives into scripts

·       Censorship, ratings, and screenwriting

We would also like to invite abstracts for presentations beyond the theme of the conference. We are looking forward to abstracts that cover the wide field of screenwriting studies, including, but not limited to, the following topics:

·       Practice-based research in the field of screenwriting 

·       Writing for series television 

·       Different screenwriting practices and formats

·       Case studies on individual writers or texts

·       Historical perspectives on screenwriting and screenplays

·       Screenwriting, the screenplay and different production structures

·       Screenwriting and narrative theory in writing for short films

·       Screenwriting for games and animation

·       Screenwriting for new media forms, online, transmedia, etc. Are stories fully transferrable from one medium to another?

·       How does the digital age change screenwriting?

 

Proposals for individual presentations and pre-constituted panels:

Time allotted to each paper is 20 minutes plus discussion. Abstracts for original paper presentations and panels may be submitted until November 15, 2016. Earlier submissions are welcome. Please note: original, in-person paper presentations only (no repetitions from other conferences or former SRN conferences. Video presentations are not possible). 

Proposals for pre-constituted panels should include no more than three presenters (20 mins for each paper), the overall issue of the panel, abstracts for all of the presentations and, if possible, the name and a short biography of the chair of the panel. The chair should not be one of the presenters. If a proposal for a panel does not include a chair, the conference committee will appoint one. 

Please send abstracts (250-300 words) as a Word document, with the email subject heading “SRN2017 Proposal” to: srn-2017proposals@otago.ac.nz

Remember to state your name, affiliation and contact information. Also include a brief biographical statement (100 words) detailing your publications and/or screenwriting practice.

We are currently in conversation with publishers about an edited anthology. If you are interested in your abstract being considered for such a publication, please indicate this in your submission.

The organising committee plans to notify of acceptances/rejections by mid-December 2016. Please see our SRN2017 website at www.otago.ac.nz/srn-2017 in the meantime. It has helpful general information regarding Dunedin, New Zealand, and travel planning options.