Doing Women’s Film and Television History Conference V: Call for Papers

Doing Women’s Film and Television History Conference V: Forming Histories/Histories in Formation

20-22 May, 2020, Maynooth University, Maynooth, Co. Kildare, Ireland

Keynote: Kasandra O’Connell, Irish Film Archive
Further Keynotes: TBC

The fifth biennial Doing Women’s Film & Television History conference invites proposals from researchers and practitioners engaged in the exploration, uncovering, archiving and dissemination of women’s roles in film and television, as well as wider media, both in the past and today.

The theme of this conference – ‘Forming Histories/ Histories in Formation’ – aims to foreground issues pertaining to the production, curation and archiving of women’s histories in film and television as well as the methods for, and approaches to, producing and shaping these histories as they form. More particularly, much can be learned from the diversity of practices, experiences and narratives of women’s film and television history as they pertain to:  national, transnational, world and global histories; neglected, peripheral or hidden histories; organisations such as museums, archives and universities; collectives, groups and movements such as #MeToo; local communities and community media; emergent forms and platforms; and historical approaches to women’s reception of film and television as well as historicising current practices and experiences of reception, fandom and consumption.

This three-day conference casts the net wide so that it can capture a range of experiences, practices, industries, nationalities and voices that are situated in relation to women and their histories. The conference provides a platform for those working in and researching film, television and media more generally as well as those invested in the production of these histories and narratives of the past and as they materialise. 

We invite papers that can provide added richness to the theme of ‘Women in Film & Television,’ and are, in addition, especially interested in the following areas:

  • International and comparative perspectives on women in film and television
  • Histories of women’s creative practice, production and technical work and film/cinema and television work more generally in various national, regional, or local contexts; transnational film and television; migration and diasporas
  • Approaches to histories of women’s indigenous production, including Third Cinema and grassroots film and television production
  • Representations of women in historical film and television
  • Female audiences, reception, fandom of film and television
  • Considerations of methodological and theoretical approaches to the study of women in film and television and their audiences
  • Archival research methods and approaches including feminist archiving practices
  • Use of recently established or historically neglected women’s media archives
  • Artefacts and ephemera in women’s archives: moving image, photographic and digital media, scripts, merchandise, etc. 
  • Considerations of how gender intersects with race, class, ethnicity, in relation to film and television production, reception or representation
  • Revisiting production and labour through the lens of #MeToo and #TimesUp, including historical formations of, and historicising, such movements
  • Changing meanings of women and womanhood as reflected and shaped by the interventions of women in film and television as producers, critics, and campaigners.
  • Teaching women’s film and television history; feminist pedagogies; the politics of education and training; women’s experiences of moving from education to employment in film and television

We welcome papers on subjects outside of these areas and that enhance the interpretations and meanings of ‘Doing Women’s Film & Television History.’

Please submit proposals of 250 words along with the paper’s title and a 50-word biography. Presentations should be no longer than 20 minutes, including clips and images. We welcome pre-constituted panels of three to four presenters (with panel title and abstract of 150 words), proposals for roundtables or workshops and presentations from researchers, practitioners, creatives and industry professionals. Deadline for proposals Oct 11th 2019. Email: dwfthv@gmail.com

We are pleased to make available a number of bursaries for Irish and international postgraduate students, early career researchers (within one-year of permanent contract) and those on part-time or zero-hour contracts. These will help support travel and accommodation to the conference. In order to apply, please submit to dwfthv@gmail.com a 250-word abstract along with a 300-word statement that includes: an indication of the relevance of your paper to the conference themes; reference to the intended output of the research; details of your current employment/student status. The deadline is Oct 11th 2019 and please use “Bursary application” in the subject line.

Hosted by
Department of Media Studies, Maynooth University
Women’s Film and Television History Network- UK/Ireland

Organising and programming committee
Mary Immaculate College, Limerick
Maynooth University
Queen’s University Belfast
University College Cork
University College Dublin

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‘Reclaiming the Screen: Addressing Overlooked Women in Film and Television’ 14th June 2019.

The following event and call for papers may be of interest to WFTHN members:

Call for Papers
‘Reclaiming the Screen: Addressing Overlooked Women in Film and Television’
Postgraduate Conference – Friday 14th June 2019.
Cinema and Television History Institute (CATHI), De Montfort University, Leicester.

Keynote speaker: Dr. Shelley Cobb (Associate Professor of Film, University of Southampton).

£5 conference free: to be paid in cash upon registration

MA travel bursaries available – email cath.postgrad@gmail.com for more information.

‘[T]he tragedy of film history is that it’s fabricated, falsified, by the very people who make film history’ – Louise Brooks

De Montfort University’s Cinema and Television History Institute (CATHI) is pleased to invite Postgraduates and Early Career Researchers to its eighth annual postgraduate conference, focusing on overlooked women in the film, television and media industries. This conference seeks to offer a platform uncovering, challenging, and drawing attention to issues relating to overlooked self-identifying women across all areas of women’s film and television history, culture, and production. There is a continued lack of gender equality within the film industry, exemplified most recently by the absence of any female nominees within the 2019 Academy Awards’ Best Director category. This conference aims to offer a platform to the voices of underrepresented, unheard and undervalued women. This conference is also an opportunity to highlight examples of women’s autonomy and agency within the television and film industries, from any era and any part of the globe.

In hosting this conference, we hope to look backwards, seeking and uncovering forgotten women, both on screen and behind the camera. In looking backwards, we aim to also push forwards in relation to challenging patriarchal structures of industrial and cultural misogyny. We welcome a broad range of proposals from a diverse range of voices, looking at the interconnectedness of past, present and future issues for female-identifying individuals on and off-screen.

The event will end with a roundtable focused on improving and challenging issues that the conference presents.

Relevant topics include, but are not limited to:

The gendering of industry roles.
Ageing woman and visibility on and off-screen.
Women in film and television academia.
Women in the film industry.
Representations of trans women, behind and in front of the camera.
The intersections of class, race, sexuality, and able-bodiedness of women.
The politics of the gaze, and challenges to how we look at women on screen.
Coming of age female representation.
Underrepresentation of female labour.
Examples of transgressive, monstrous and subversive femininities on screen.
Forgotten figures.
The #MeToo movement.
Proposals for twenty-minute presentations (both traditional and non) should include the title of the presentation, a 250-word abstract, and a brief biographical statement. Proposals should be submitted to cath.postgrad@gmail.com by Friday 12th April 2019.

Applicants will be notified in late April/early May.

Twitter: @CATHpostgrad | #CATHCON19

Persistence of Vision: Women Reframing Animation: 28th June 2019: Goldsmiths, University of London

The following event and call for papers may be of interest to WFTHN members:

Persistence of Vision: Women Reframing Animation
Friday 28th June 2019
Goldsmiths, University of London

Keynote speaker: Caroline Ruddell, Brunel University

Call for Papers deadline: Friday 12th April 2019

We are inviting contributions for this one-day symposium, supported by MeCCSA Women’s Network and hosted by the Department of Media, Communications and Cultural Studies at Goldsmiths, to be held on Friday 28th June.

Animation is a medium like no other. It is accessible in ways other forms of film making are not; it breaks down cultural, social and technical boundaries and as such has a distinctive potential as a tool for education, activism and engagement. It has the power to imagine all sorts of possibilities, and as such has a unique ability to illuminate and realise radical ideas and concepts – particularly for those cultural creators traditionally excluded from creative systems of power.

This symposium provides an inclusive space for academics, practitioners and students to investigate what it is about animation that attracts and gives space to these voices, while also asking what might be done to amplify them at industry level. It will be an opportunity to explore the subversive nature of animation and consider ways that this medium, in various forms, can be used as a critical resource to communicate, engage and engender social change.

In response to this, we welcome papers, innovative presentations and workshops (details of workshop facilities below) on, but not limited to, the following topics:
The impact of identity on animation production/ autobiographical animation
Animated documentary/ documentary animation/ essay films
Feminism and animation
Animated activism
Application of animation for teaching, learning and research
Animation as interdisciplinary exploration/ collaboration
Animation for pleasure and profit: making your space in the industry
Abstracts of up to 250 words, as well as full author details (name, position, contact details and institutional affiliation/s if applicable), should be submitted by Friday 12th April 2019 to Ceiren Bell at c.bell@gold.ac.uk. Contributors will be notified of the outcome by Friday 10th May 2019.

This event is inclusive of all who identify as women – trans, non-binary and cis – and we value all voices, experiences and participants regardless of their academic standing, educational level, ethnicity, class, (dis)abilities, or employment status. We are unable to provide childcare facilities, but children are welcome to attend the conference under the supervision and responsibility of their parent(s).

WORKSHOP SESSION

We are looking for creative, dynamic, interactive and practical proposals for a 1 – 2 hour workshop session to create a collaborative animated piece that seeks to explore animation as a radical, empowering experiential practice.
The session will involve 20 – 30 participants, with two student helpers. Participants may include animators, academics and students from the University as well as local schools and colleges. The available space has tables and chairs and a Mac-based audio-visual system. There is a small budget for paper, drawing materials etc and there are four digital SLR cameras and tripods available.

Submissions are welcome from anyone who is involved in any aspect of animation.

Eyes Unclouded: The Films of Hayao Miyazaki and Studio Ghibli — 7-8 May Depot Cinema, Lewes, East Sussex

The following event and call for papers may be of interest to WFTHN members:

Eyes Unclouded: The Films of Hayao Miyazaki and Studio Ghibli

 7-8 May Depot Cinema, Lewes, East Sussex

May 7th screening of Porco Rosso (dir. Hayao Miyazaki, 1992) at the Depot Cinema, Lewes.
May 8th Symposium, Depot Cinema, Lewes, East Sussex, UK

Keynote speaker: Dr Rayna Denison: “Miyakazi’s Worlds of Women: Feminism in the Films and Working Practices of Studio Ghibli”

“You must see with eyes unclouded by hate. See the good in that which is evil, and the evil in that which is good. Pledge yourself to neither side, but vow instead to preserve the balance that exists between the two”

— Princess Mononoke

Hayao Miyazaki is an unusual figure. Only Walt Disney rivals him in for closeness of his association with the studio he co-founded. Unlike Disney, however, Miyazaki was also a director, further complicating distinctions between individual and industrial authorship in the works he helmed for Ghibli. Often fantastical, his films are also intimately bound up with very real social and historical questions, ranging from environmentalism, to the cultural politics of girlhood, to Japan’s role in World War Two. Though identifiably Japanese, Ghibli is also nothing if not transnational. The studio has developed adaptations of novels by Mary Norton, Diana Wynne Jones, and Ursula K. Le Guin, and its characters have acquired an on- and offline life of their own in multiple languages and markets; Hello Kitty is arguably Japan’s only culture industry export to compete with Ghibli for global penetration and recognition. Finally, Miyazaki’s anime blurs the boundaries that are often imposed on the form both inside and outside the academy. Films such as the Oscar and Golden Bear-winning Spirited Away challenge (western) perceptions of the cartoon as children’s entertainment, and contemporary expectations of animation as a digital endeavor, all while achieving both market success and critical acclaim. Perhaps part of their appeal lies in their resistance to easy categorization.

This one-day symposium seeks to bring together scholars to discuss the work of Miyazaki and Studio Ghibli. We are open to proposals on all aspects of this topic, and from a broad variety of perspectives. These could include issues of industrial and studio authorship; the cultural politics of representation; material culture (e.g. the Ghibli Museum, merchandising); the transnational circulation, reception, and influence of these films; or their digital afterlives. This is just a small selection of potential examples.

Please send proposals for 20-minute papers to the organizer, Dr Luke Robinson (luke.robinson@sussex.ac.uk) by March 31st 2019. Proposals should include a title, a 250-word abstract, and a brief author biography.

 

EVENT: Advancing Gender Equal Media: Challenges, Strategies and DIY Culture

On behalf of Karen Ross, an event of interest to WFTHN members:

Advancing Gender Equal Media: Challenges, Strategies and DIY Culture26 February 2019 | 1430-1730 | Press Club Brussels 

The problem of women’s unequal access to and representation in mainstream media is not new and research studies focused on the European media industry over at least the past 30 years, including work commissioned by EU institutions, have demonstrated the challenges women face in developing a career in the media and being represented in ways which reflect their lived experience. In 1995, the UN’s Fourth World Conference on Women took place in Beijing and from that gathering, the Beijing Platform for Action emerged as a global call to eradicate gender equality from society: one of the critical areas of concern identified was the media. In the same year, the first Global Media Monitoring Project took place which monitored how women and men appeared in news media around the globe. Every five years since the BPfA, reviews have been undertaken to see how far the original ambitions have been met, along with various ad hoc studies undertaken by NGOs, EU institutions and civil society organisations.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, each review and new piece of research finds that although there has been progress, it is slow and uncoordinated, so further indicators are developed, further strategies written. Both the European Parliament and the Council of Europe have produced research and recommendations around gender equality and the media: media organisations have been active in developing internal initiatives to support women’s careers or designed actions to monitor gender-bias in content, but they rarely tell anyone else about them. Civil society organisations and individuals have also been active over the past few years and, impatient for a gender-equal future, have been working hard to bring the issue to public attention through the use of digital platforms and hashtag activism such as #metoo and #timesup. However, despite all this good work, the goal of achieving gender equality in the media remains elusive, not least because there are no mechanisms through which to promote the good practices which have been initiated.

That is, no mechanisms until now!

We are pleased to invite you to the launch of the AGEMI  (Advancing Gender Equality in Media Industries) project and web platform where you can find a range of useful resources focused on aspects of gender equality, including a Resources Bank of (around 100) Good Practices and learning resources which include mini-lectures and filmed interviews with media practitioners on topics such as representation, culture, policy, advocacy and leadership. Gender issues are rarely included as a specific aspect of journalism training so AGEMI is addressing this absence. AGEMI has also piloted two activities to build links between students and the world of work through its summer school and internships. We believe that including such activities as part of media education encourages gender-sensitivity amongst the next generation of journalists and thus has the potential to influence the wider media landscape.

As well as demonstrating the AGEMI platform, we will also hear from a range of stakeholders about the work they are doing to challenge gender inequality in the media.We believe this kind of knowledge exchange is both necessary and timely, particularly in advance of the Beijing+25 review which will take place in 2020 with the aim of informing the implementation and raising awareness of the gender-media dimensions of the 2030 gender-equality agenda. We hope you can join us to celebrate the launch of this much-needed new resource and engage in a productive dialogue and we hope to see you in Brussels.

The event is free but please register here by 19 February 2019.

For further information, please contact Karen Ross

DRAFT SCHEDULE for the launch (subject to change)

14:30 – welcome refreshments
14:40 – welcome and brief background to AGEMI
14:50 – policy discussion #1 – European Parliament (speaker tbc)
15:10 – media industry discussion #1 – Safia Kessas, RTBF (Belgian public service broadcaster)
15:30 – policy discussion #2 – Council of Europe, Gender Equality Division (speaker tbc)
15:50 – break
16:10 – demonstration of AGEMI platform
16:40 – researching gender equality and media – Maria Edstrom, University of Gothenburg
16:50 – policy discussion #3 – European Women’s Lobby (speaker tbc)
17:10 – media industry discussion #2 – Martine Simonsis (AJP)
17:30 – close/drinks reception